Making OUR COAST OUR FUTURE more resilient

Overview

Council has commenced the development of a Shoreline Erosion Management Plan for the Boyne Island and Tannum Sands foreshore. The study area includes approximately 22km from Lilley’s Beach in the north to Bangalee in the south.

Council has recently achieved a significant milestone in being one of the first councils in Queensland to complete Our Coast. Our Future. – Gladstone’s Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy under the QCoast2100 program.

The Boyne Island and Tannum Sands (BITS) SEMP is one of the priority short-term actions from this Strategy and is one of many steps we are taking to proactively manage our coastline now, and into the future.

Council has identified the 22km stretch between Lilley’s Beach and Bangalee as a priority area for erosion and foreshore management.

CHAS BITS

How can I get involved?

There are many ways you can get involved right now. You can:

  • Tell us about why the Boyne Island and Tannum Sands shoreline is important and meaningful to you
  • Tell us about how the coast has changed over time and key events that you believe are linked to coastal changes
  • Drop in to the first of two community project engagement sessions at the Boyne Tannum Community Centre at the following times:
    • 31st May any time from 6pm to 8pm
    • 1st June any time from 9am to 11am
    Register your interest to attend through "Register here"
  • Subscribe to receive regular updates and to be invited to future project engagement sessions by "+Follow" Our Coast. Our Future or Boyne Island Tannum Sand SEMP.

In the next few months, we will also have additional community project information sessions as we develop and finalise some of the management options.

Important & Meaningful

Tell us: Why is the shoreline important and meaningful to you?

Tell us about why the shoreline is important and meaningful to you

13 June, 2022

john_norris says:

“The shoreline needs vegetation like Coastal Stand and Marram grass like in front of the lifesavers not sheoak trees that when eroded destroy”

13 June, 2022

john_norris says:

“I’m local for over sixty years. Boyne to Hummock Island leave it alone. Interfered with once and it’s still a disaster. No more useles trees”

9 June, 2022

gerschn says:

“We are concerned about the abuse of our shoreline - Illegal driving on dunes, clearing of vegetation for "better views", beach modification.”

9 June, 2022

gerschn says:

“The BITS shoreline is the most intact natural accessible shoreline in the Gladstone area. It is also regarded as the most scenic shoreline.”

Coast Changes & Key Events

Tell us: How the coast has changed overtime and are their key events that are linked?

Tell us about how the coast has changed over time and key events that you believe are linked to coastal changes.

9 June, 2022

gerschn says:

“We have observed continual natural movements of sand and the river estuaries during the 33year period of our residence. Floods do contribute”

3 June, 2022

Lawsey1 says:

“This coast line changes minimally but also reverts back over time. My experience over apx 65 yrs has seen it cycle, so please take heed.”

Find out more on BITS SEMP

What is impacting the Boyne Island and Tannum Sands shoreline/or Why is the Boyne Island and Tannum Sands shoreline eroding?

The Boyne Island and Tannum Sands coastline is quite unique, having sections of both sandy and rocky shores, natural foreshores, estuaries and creeks across the 22km stretch of coastline.

This coastline is continually changing due to the winds, waves, tides, and currents. Over time these weather events move sand and sediments to shape the shoreline and our beaches.

These climatic changes can threaten and negatively impact foreshore infrastructure and buildings, as well as impact important coastal places and natural habitats, and how we use the coastline.

What is a Shoreline Erosion Management Plan and how is it developed?

A Shoreline Erosion Management Plan provides Council with a framework to proactively plan for and manage coastline erosion over the short to medium term (5-20 years).

BITS SEMP study

The Shoreline Erosion Management Plan is developed by building an understanding of the local coastal processes and hazards and developing options to allow us to better live with or mitigate these hazards in the short- to medium-term. This is a careful balancing act to ensure we also protect and maintain what the community loves most about the Boyne Island and Tannum Sands shoreline.

An important part of the project is to build on local experience, knowledge and ideas for how to make the Boyne Island and Tannum Sands shoreline more resilient now and in the future. We value the community’s involvement.